Monday, July 28, 2014

The Lady and the Officer (Civil War Heroines #2) by Mary Ellis

The Lady and the Officer

The Lady and the Officer

Love, Loyalty, and Espionage…
How Does a Lady Live with All Three?
As a nurse after the devastating battle of Gettysburg, Madeline Howard saves the life of Elliot Haywood, a colonel in the Confederacy. But even though she must soon make her home in the South, her heart and political sympathies belong to General James Downing, a Union Army corps commander.
Colonel Haywood has not forgotten the beautiful nurse who did so much for him, and when he unexpectedly meets her again in Richmond, he is determined to win her. While spending time with army officers and war department officials in her aunt and uncle’s palatial home, Madeline overhears plans for Confederate attacks against the Union soldiers. She knows passing along this information may save the life of her beloved James, but at what cost? Can she really betray the trust of her family and friends? Is it right to allow Elliott to dream of a future with her?
Two men are in love with Madeline. Will her faith in God show her the way to a bright future, or will her choices bring devastation on those she loves?
  • Retail Price: 13.99
  • Release Date: August 1, 2014
  • Page Count: 350
  • Size: 5 1/2 x 8 1/2
  • ISBN: 978-0-7369-5054-1
Read a Chapter One of The Lady and the Officer

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About The Author

Mary Ellis grew up close to the eastern Ohio Amish community, Geauga County, where her parents often took her to farmer's markets and woodworking fairs. She loved their peaceful, agrarian lifestyle, their respect for the land, and their strong sense of Christian community.
She and her husband now live close to the largest population of Amish in the country--a four-county area in central Ohio. They often take weekend trips to purchase produce, meet Amish families, and enjoy a simpler way of life.
Mary enjoys reading, traveling, gardening, bicycling and swimming. But her favorite past-time is snorkeling, which she seldom gets to do living in Ohio. She is a former middle school teacher and a former saleswoman for the world's best chocolate company. Now she writes full-time and wonders why her house is still dusty and her garden has so many weeds.

My Review:

The Lady and The Officer, takes place during the Civil War, a war that tore our Country apart. This is Madeline Howards story, and a remarkable woman she was, loosing her new husband to the war, then loosing her home, and livelihood, she embarks across enemy lines to stay with the only family she has remaining, in the Capital of the Confederacy, Richmond Va.
With her loyalties lying with the North she is now living with her Aunt and Uncle and Cousin in the South. Not only that, but her Uncle works directly with Jefferson Davis, President of The Confederacy. Before she left the North she had an encounter with a Union General, James Dowling, and now she is in the South with Col Elliot Haywood, the only patient, her one-day of nursing, she saved.
Now there are two men who are vying for her, and it takes until the end of the book to find out whom God has chosen for her. I loved seeing how these people lived during this tough time, Madeline’s family are rather well off, but times and circumstances of the War sure change things. With all the death, and hardships that War brings, we watch these people dig in and give to those who are less fortunate. There are also tidbits of real facts about what is going on at this time, such a black mark on our beloved Country.
We of course, living way in the future from this time, know what happens, and who wins, but in a way everyone was a looser. I felt the only way any of them survived was because of their great faith in God, no mater which church they worshiped in.
Journey with Madeline on this historic visit and decisions that alter all of their lives, you will be glad you picked up this book.

I received this book through Net Galley and the Publisher Harvest House, and was not required to give a positive review.

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