Thursday, June 5, 2014

The Midwife by Jolina Petersheim

Since the day Rhoda Mummau was baptized into the Old Order Mennonite Church and became the head midwife of Hopen Haus, she's been torn between the needs of the unwed mothers under her care and her desire to conceal the secrets of her past. Contact with the outside world could provide medical advantages, but remaining secluded in the community gives her the anonymity she craves.Graduate student Beth Winslow is on a path she never would have chosen. Heartbroken after surrendering a baby to adoption, she devotes herself to her studies until she becomes pregnant again, this time as a surrogate. But when early tests indicate possible abnormalities, Beth is unprepared for the parents' decision to end the pregnancy--and for the fierce love she feels for this unborn child. Desperate, she flees the city and seeks refuge at Hopen House.Past and present collide when a young woman named Amelia arrives to the sweeping countryside bearing secrets of her own. As Amelia's due date draws near, Rhoda must face her past and those she thought she had left behind in order for the healing power of love and forgiveness to set them all free.

About The Author:


Jolina Petersheim is the bestselling author of The Outcast, which Library Journal called "outstanding . . . fresh and inspirational" in a starred review and named one of the best books of 2013. She holds degrees in English and communication arts from the University of the Cumberlands, and her writing has been featured in venues as varied as radio programs, nonfiction books, and numerous online and print publications. Her blog is syndicated with The Tennessean's "On Nashville" blog roll, and she also blogs weekly with nine other authors at Southern Belle View. Jolina and her husband share the same unique Amish and Mennonite heritage that originated in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, but now live in the mountains of Tennessee with their young daughter. Follow Jolina and her blog at

My Review: 

The Midwife is one riveting read, a real page-turner, and you really never see what is coming. This is one where I can usually figure out the ending in my mind, not this one.
As we travel down on journey of life, it is probably a very good thing that we cannot see what is around the next corner. We travel with Beth, really beginning with her consensual decision to be a surrogate, having already experienced the pain of giving up a child to adoption. How she thought that it would be easier the second time is beyond me, although genetically the child wasn’t related to her.
Funny how God places people in our path that and that appears to be just what happens in Rhoda/Beth’s case. Of course there is evil present, and it is hard to believe the form it takes, and yet even this has some good in it.
Although we are in a Mennonite Community, you basically will see no difference here than in an Amish Community, this one is really Old Order. No electricity, or cars, and we are mainly in a home for unwed mothers, from all backgrounds. For some this must be a really rude awakening!
As we travel in Beth’s shoes, I wholly agreed with her decisions, and loved how she becomes the person she does, and how all things work out. A really great read.

I received this book from Tyndale House Publishers through Net Galley, and was not required to give a positive review. 


  1. Thank you, Maureen, for the wonderful review. I appreciate it so much! :)



  2. Great review! I really want to read this book!
    Also, I nominated you for the Sunflower Blogger Award if you are interested.